Reduce bills and carbon footprint with energy efficient glazing

Energy efficient glazing helps reduce your carbon footprint and energy bills, whether with double or triple glazing, secondary glazing or just heavier curtains.

Energy efficient windows also mean:

  • A more comfortable home – energy efficient glazing reduces heat loss through windows and means fewer draughts and cold spots.
  • Peace and quiet – as well as keeping the heat in, energy efficient windows insulate your property against external noise.
  • Reduced condensation – energy efficient glazing reduces condensation build-up on the inside of windows.

However, before installing double glazing, check with your local planning office if any of the following apply:

  • You are located in a conservation area.
  • You have an Article 4 direction on your property, removing the right of permitted development.
  • The property is a listed building.

Conservation areas and listed buildings

If your property is in a conservation area or in a listed building, there may be restrictions on what you can do to the windows. These areas are of special architectural or historic interest, meaning that any work you carry out on your home must preserve or enhance the character of the area.

This does not necessarily mean you cannot replace the windows but might mean you will need to get windows that complement the character of the building and area. Double glazing can be made to look like the building’s original windows but for any changes you need to contact the local council’s conservation officer for guidance.

There are a number of non-intrusive window insulation options available for historic properties such as shutters, secondary glazing and sealed blinds. However, each historic building is considered individually.

Listed buildings have tight controls on what you can change on the outside and sometimes the inside as well, depending on their grading. Old sash windows in historic properties can be protected not only for their appearance but also the materials and methods used to make them. But secondary glazing can be a non-intrusive way of insulated historic windows from the inside and may be granted permission.

Sash windows

Sash window units are common features of period properties and can be a design feature. They consist of two vertically sliding frames, but are often badly fitting and made of single pane glass so have poor insulating properties.

If you want to insulate sash windows, there are a number of alternatives to conventional double glazing. If you want to keep the design and look of the sash windows, there are units available that are in keeping with the original design; these are fitted and sealed to prevent draughts and incorporate double glazing to reduce heat loss. The frames don’t need to be plastic but can be metal or wood with an insulated core.

An increasing number of double glazing companies offer double glazing in period properties. Replacing sash windows can be expensive so good quality secondary glazing may be worth considering.

Secondary glazing

A secondary pane of glass and frame can be fitted inside the existing window reveal. This won’t be as well sealed as a double glazing unit but will be much cheaper to fit and will still save energy. Low emissivity glass will improve the performance of secondary glazing.

Understanding energy ratings

Some window manufacturers show the energy efficiency of their products using an energy rating scale from A++ to E. The whole window – the frame and the glass – is assessed on its efficiency at retaining heat. The scheme is run by the British Fenestration Rating Council.

U-values

Windows that have an energy rating will have the u-value of the window displayed on the energy label. A u-value is a measure of how easily heat can pass through a material. Materials that let out more heat have higher u-values whereas materials that let less heat pass through them have lower u-values.

In some cases, windows with a higher energy performance rating might have a higher u-value than windows with a better energy efficiency rating. This might seem the wrong way round as lower u-values indicate better insulation levels. However, in these cases it will be that there are other aspects of the window that make them better overall, such as coating used on the glass and the gap between the glass panes.

Ventilation

Replacement windows will be more airtight than the original frames so condensation may build up in your property due to the reduced ventilation. If the property does not have much background ventilation, look for replacement windows with trickle vents incorporated into the frame to let in a controlled amount of ventilation.

If you start to see condensation building up around your windows, there may be a damp problem in your property. As a general rule, damp occurs when there is inadequate ventilation, inadequate heating, inadequate insulation or a combination of these. If you have started to notice condensation in between the panes of glass in the double glazing units, then it is likely that the seal is broken and the unit will need to be replaced.

Source: Energy Saving Trust

Avoid energy waste during your business Christmas shutdown

Companies shutting down for business over Christmas and New Year are being urged to pay close attention to energy saving measures during the festive break.

To avoid energy waste which could amount to huge sums of money, Inteb Managed Services has produced a checklist which, with some simple tasks and ideas, can result in financial and environmental gains.

Raja Khan, commercial director at Inteb, explained: “It’s that time of the year when many companies are working through their to-do lists before shutting down for Christmas and New Year and it’s easy to overlook energy saving measures.

“That’s why it’s important to think now about getting your business ready for winter. Some of the steps to take are simple and maybe obvious – but added together these moves to reduce energy consumption can have a massive cost-saving impact.”

Before shutting down for the Christmas and New Year break:

  • Turn off all lights, including lamps, desk lights, external lights and any Christmas lights.
  • Fully shut down and turn off all computers and printers. A single monitor and computer left on 24 hours a day will cost around £45 a year.
  • Turn off all machinery and equipment, including kitchen appliances.
  • Turn off all fans, heaters and air conditioning units and set radiators to freeze protection mode. This will ensure they are off for the duration of the break and not wasting energy and should also stop pipes from freezing.
  • Turn off all vending machines that do not contain perishable goods.
  • Close all windows and both external and internal door.
  • Empty, defrost and switch off freezers.
  • Check all taps are turned off.

Get all staff involved. Ensure everyone knows they are responsible for their own personal equipment, such as computers and desk lamps, and nominate a couple of members of staff to do a final walk-round before everyone leaves for the holiday.

Earlier this month the UK’s gas and electricity network companies launched a Be Ready for Winter campaign aimed at helping the public better prepare for power cuts and gas emergencies that may result from bad winter weather.

The campaign encourages everyone to make note of these free emergency numbers – in a power cut dial 105 or, for a gas emergency, dial 0800 111999.

Survey shows how smart meters impact on energy-saving behaviour

Research has shown that around 86 per cent of people who have had a smart meter installed make significant changes to their energy-saving behaviour.

Smart Energy GB – the government body tasked with ensuring customers understand smart meters – surveyed 2,332 people’s energy attitudes and usage before and after upgrading to a smart meter and found, in most cases, this enthusiasm is maintained during the months and years after installation.

The results also show nearly four in 10 people fitted energy efficient lightbulbs immediately after having a smart meter installed, increasing to more than two-thirds of those who have had one for more than two years.

Claire Maugham, director of policy and communications at Smart Energy GB, said: “This research shows that smart meters are bringing real changes to people’s bills and that we’re using them to make positive changes to our energy behaviour the longer we have them.”
How much will it cost to have a smart meter installed?

You will not be charged separately for a smart meter or for the in-home display. Under current arrangements, you pay for the cost of your meter and its maintenance through your energy bills; this will be the same for smart meters.

Do I have to have a smart meter?

While government and Ofgem believe that all consumers will benefit from having smart meters, they aren’t compulsory and you can choose not to have one.

Choosing not to have a smart meter installed may mean you don’t have access to all the available tariffs on the market, some of which could be cheaper.

If you do not want to have a smart meter installed now, you will still be able to have one installed free of charge at a later date.

Smart meters and switching

If you have a smart meter, you can shop around and switch supplier as before.

During the foundation stage of the smart meter rollout, a number of suppliers are installing first generation smart meters. Consumers with first generation smart meters can realise, at an early stage, many of the benefits of smart metering. If you switch supplier and the new supplier cannot operate the meter in smart mode, they will need to operate it as a traditional meter with meter readings taken manually.

Suppliers are expected to start installing second generation smart meters in late 2017. All suppliers will be able to operate second generation meters. This is because the government has appointed a company – the Data and Communications Company (DCC) – to establish a new national infrastructure that will enable communications between smart meters and all energy suppliers.

In time it’s planned that first generation smart meters will be part of the DCC system too. This will give everyone the flexibility to switch between suppliers without losing smart features.

Smart meters in rented property

If you directly pay your energy supplier for the gas or electricity in your rented property, you can choose to have a smart meter installed. However, it is recommended you tell your landlord before you get one. There may be rules in your tenancy agreement about how energy is supplied to the property, including the type of meter that can be installed. If the landlord pays the energy bill for the property, then the decision to get a smart meter is up to them.

If your tenancy agreement says you need your landlord’s permission to alter metering at your property, your landlord or letting agency should not unreasonably prevent it.

Smart meters and your data

You have a choice about how your energy consumption data is used, apart from where it is required for billing and other regulated purposes.

You will be able to see your real-time energy consumption data on your in-home display. You will also be able to download detailed historical data from your home network, should you wish to.

Your energy company, and the energy networks, can access appropriate data to enable them to send you accurate bills and carry out other essential tasks. For example, suppliers can access monthly consumption data for billing purposes.

Suppliers will have to get your consent to access half-hourly data, or to use data for marketing purposes. They can access daily data unless you object.

You will also be able to share data with third parties, such as switching sites, if you want them to give you advice on the best tariff for you.

Efficient boilers can help to cut energy bills

Heating accounts for about 60 per cent of what you spend in a year on energy bills – so an efficient boiler makes a big difference.

Modern boilers are more efficient for several reasons but their main advantage is that they are all condensing boilers. All well-maintained boilers burn their fuel very efficiently but they inevitably lose some heat in the hot gases that escape up the flue. A condensing boiler has a larger heat exchanger so it recovers more heat, sends cooler gases up the flue and is more efficient.

Sometimes the flue gases get so cool that the water vapour in the gas condenses out – hence the name – and even more energy is recovered from the condensing vapour.

What should I consider when replacing my boiler?

If it is time to change your boiler, you need to decide what type of boiler is right for you. Here are some things to consider:

Fuel type – If you have mains gas, a gas boiler is likely to be the cheapest heating option. Fuel prices as of May 2017 suggest that oil heating is currently a cheaper option; however, historically oil heating has been more expensive.

If you don’t have a gas supply to your premises, it might be worth considering a form of low carbon heating such as a heat pump or biomass. With the renewable heat incentive, these may be a cheaper overall. Alternatively, you may want to get a gas connection to your premises. The company that owns and operates the gas network in your area may be able to help with the cost of getting a new connection – and it may even be fully funded.

Boiler type – Most old gas and oil boilers are regular boilers that have a separate hot water cylinder to store hot water rather than providing it directly from the boiler. When you replace your boiler, you can buy a new regular boiler – and keep your hot water cylinder – or buy a combi boiler that doesn’t need a cylinder. A regular boiler is more efficient than a combi at producing hot water in the first place, but then some heat is lost from the hot water cylinder, so a combi may be more efficient overall.

Space at your premises – Combi boilers don’t need hot water cylinders and so require less space.
Compatibility with solar water heating – If you’re thinking of installing solar water heating, it’s worth noting that many combi boilers are not compatible with this heating system or cannot use it so effectively.

Finding an installer – For a list of registered installers visit the Competent Persons Register, SNIPEF OF HHIC. For gas and LPG boilers, the installer must be Gas Safe registered. For oil boilers, an OFTEC registered installer is recommended. It’s worth getting three quotes from different installers. Your registered installer will ensure that your system complies with current building regulations and will make sure you get all the documentation to prove this. Keep these documents safe; you will need them when you sell the property.

Source: Energy Saving Trust

Inteb’s vital energy messages to young people in local community

Tackling climate change and saving energy are among some of the most important issues facing the current generation.

To get these vital environmental messages across, Inteb Managed Services has been going out into the community to talk to young people about how their own individual efforts can be a powerful force for good.

The first Inteb energy awareness workshop took place at The Hive Youth Zone in Birkenhead, a new £6m state-of-the-art youth centre with more than 5,000 members from across the region.

A group of Young Leaders took part in a session, led by Raja Khan, commercial director at Inteb, when they were given some invaluable help and advice about the importance of conserving energy – for the future of the planet as well as for the future health of their own finances.

Raja said: “The workshop at The Hive was a wonderful opportunity to get a group of young people together to talk to them in an informal setting about energy issues that are so vital to them and to future generations.

“Most of this age group are still living at home but it’s important for them to be aware of how the smallest change in their energy usage can impact on the household bills.

“Getting into good habits now sets them in good stead for when they are homeowners themselves or renting a property.

“Hopefully, they will take all the information on board and pass it on to their families, friends and other young people at The Hive.”

A survey by the Energy Saving Trust showed that only seven per cent of those aged under 35 said they fully understood their energy bill.

Philip Sellwood, chief executive of the Energy Saving Trust, pointed out: “We now have a generation who don’t understand their bills and have little idea where energy comes from. One reason for this is that many young people rent and do not own their home, they are simply not invested in energy efficiency like their older relatives.

“We are calling on one generation to impart their knowledge to another so young people can learn to save energy and not worry so much about their bills in the future”

Among the tips Raja and Matthew passed on to The Hive’s members were:

  • If you’re not watching the TV, turn it off at the plug. Not turning of unused appliances is a huge contributor to high energy bills.
  • Finished charging your phone, laptop or tablet? Turn it off at the plug.
  • Toasters and microwaves which aren’t used on a daily basis can also be turned off and turned back on again when needed.
  • Save money by using a lower water pressure on the shower. The difference on your bills can be enormous.
  • Try to keep the fridge full. The more that’s in there, the less energy it uses because it doesn’t have to work as hard.
  • A simple way to save energy in the winter is to wrap up warm rather than turning up the heating.

Smart meters: How consumers can control their energy usage

The government’s smart meter programme is continuing to roll with almost five million new meters now operating in the UK.

But there’s a long way to go as there are more than 26 million homes for energy suppliers to get to, with the goal of every home having a smart meter by 2020.

Raja Khan, commercial direct at Inteb Managed Services, explained: “Smart meters put consumers in control of their energy use, allowing them to adopt energy efficiency measures that can help save money on energy bills and offset price increases.

“They are the next generation of gas and electricity meters and offer a range of intelligent functions. For example, they can show how much energy is being used through an in-home display and they communicate directly with the energy supplier, meaning there will be an end to visits by meter readers to your premises.”

However, smart meters aren’t compulsory and people can choose not to have one. This means the national roll-out won’t just happen automatically and consumers need to have as much information about them as possible before making any decision.

Here are some answers to important questions about smart meters.

Are smart meters compulsory?

Smart meters are not compulsory; it’s entirely your choice. The government requires energy suppliers to offer smart meters to all homes and small businesses across Great Britain by 2020, but whether you accept them is completely up to you. More than four in five people who have a smart meter say they would recommend one.

What exactly are smart meters? Smart meters are the new generation of gas and electricity meters. They are being installed across the country, at no extra cost, to replace the traditional meters – including pre-pay key meters. They will give consumers more control over energy use and help them to understand bills and the energy system.

What do smart meters do?

A smart meter sends automatic meter readings directly to the energy supplier, resulting in accurate bills, an end to estimates and manual meter readings. The in-home display is a portable device which shows how much energy is being used and what it’s costing in pounds and pence, in near real time. Both smart meter and display will be installed by the energy supplier at no extra cost.

How do smart meters work?

The smart meter measures how much gas and electricity being used and shares this directly and securely with the energy supplier and the in-home display, using wireless technology. You won’t have to take any meter readings manually – the smart meter will send automatic readings to the energy supplier via a secure national network which is solely for smart meters. This works in the same way as other wireless systems like car remote keys or TVs, using radio waves. Though it is a wireless system, you don’t need Wi-Fi for it to work and the meter won’t use your Wi-Fi if you do have it.

How accurate are smart meters?

Smart meters are as accurate as traditional meters. By law, all smart meters have to be certified by the National Measurement Office to prove their accuracy but if you do think there’s a fault, it can be reported to the Energy Ombudsman.

Is a broadband connection necessary to use a smart meter? No – smart meters use an entirely separate, bespoke wireless system.

Who can access my smart meter data and how is it used? Only the supplier, and they won’t share any of it without permission. The meter will keep your data secure. Depending on how often you agree to share it with your supplier, the smart meter will send half-hourly, daily or monthly meter readings. You can change your preference for how often you share this information at any point by getting in contact with your supplier directly. The energy supplier may also use this information to provide tailored energy efficiency advice and improve the service they provide for you.

How can a smart meter save money?

Using the information shown on the in-home display should be able to help cut energy costs. Smart meters also mean accurate bills, consumers only paying for what has actually been used rather than overpaying, as sometimes happens with estimates.

Can a smart meter help with energy efficiency?

Smart meters make it easier to identify situations where a lot of energy is being used and where consumers might want to make changes to reduce it. They are also a crucial step towards the development of the smart grid, a new way of running our energy network. Energy suppliers will be better equipped to plan and manage the country’s electricity and gas and match supply and demand. Also, smart appliances will be able to interact with smart meter systems to help save energy – for example, setting the dishwasher to come on when electricity is cheapest or by getting a text message if the heating has been left on on by mistake.

How those lightbulb moments can save energy

The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of bulb and the cost of electricity.

The type of lightbulb you use is important for several reasons. All lightbulbs have a nominal or rated operating life which is affected by how many times they are turned on and off; the more often they are switched on and off, the lower their operating life.

Incandescent lighting

Incandescent lights should be turned off whenever they are not needed because they are the least efficient type of lighting. Around 90 per cent of the energy they use is given off as heat and only about 10 per cent results in light. Turning lights off will also keep a room cooler, an extra benefit in the summer.

Halogen lighting

While halogens are more efficient than traditional incandescent bulbs, they use the same technology and are far less efficient than CFLs and LEDs. Therefore, it is best to turn these lights off whenever they are not needed.

CFL lighting

Since they are already very efficient, the cost effectiveness of turning CFLs off to conserve energy is a bit more complicated. A general rule-of-thumb is this:

  • If you will be out of a room for 15 minutes or less, leave it on.
  • If you will be out of a room for more than 15 minutes, turn it off.

The operating life of CFLs is more affected by the number of times they are switched on and off. You can generally extend the life of a CFL bulb more by switching it on and off less frequently than if you simply use it less.

It is a popularly held belief that CFLs use a lot of energy to get started and it is better not to turn them off for short periods. The amount of energy varies between manufacturers and models—however, ENERGY STAR© rated bulbs are required to endure rapid cycling for five-minute intervals to ensure that they can hold up to frequent switching. In any case, the relatively higher “inrush” current required lasts for half a cycle, or 1/120th of a second.

The amount of electricity consumed to supply the inrush current is equal to a few seconds or less of normal light operation. Turning off fluorescent lights for more than five seconds will save more energy than will be consumed in turning them back on again. Therefore, the real issue is the value of the electricity saved by turning the light off relative to the cost of changing a lightbulb. This in turn determines the shortest cost-effective period for turning off a fluorescent light.

The value of the energy saved by turning a CFL off depends on several factors:

  • The price an electric utility charges its customers depends on the customer classes”, which are typically residential, commercial, and industrial. There can be different rate schedules within each class.
  • Some utilities may charge different rates for electricity consumption during different times of the day. It generally costs more for utilities to generate power during certain periods of high demand or consumption, called peaks.
  • Some utilities can charge commercial and industrial customers more per kilowatt-hour (kWh) during peak periods than for consumption off-peak.
  • Some utilities may also charge a base rate for a certain level of consumption and higher rates for increasing blocks of consumption.
  • Often a utility adds miscellaneous service charges, a base charge, and/or taxes per billing period that could be averaged per kWh consumed, if these are not already factored into the rate.

LED lighting

The operating life of a light emitting diode (LED) is unaffected by turning it on and off. While lifetime is reduced for fluorescent lamps the more often they are switched on and off, there is no negative effect on LED lifetime. This characteristic gives LEDs several distinct advantages when it comes to operations. For example, LEDs have an advantage when used in conjunction with occupancy sensors or daylight sensors that rely on on-off operation. Also, in contrast to traditional technologies, LEDs turn on at full brightness almost instantly, with no delay.

LEDs are also largely unaffected by vibration because they do not have filaments or glass enclosures.

Efficient boiler contributory to saving on energy bills

Heating accounts for about 60 per cent of what you spend in a year on energy bills – so an efficient boiler makes a big difference.

Modern boilers are more efficient for several reasons but their main advantage is that they are all condensing boilers. All well-maintained boilers burn their fuel very efficiently but they inevitably lose some heat in the hot gases that escape up the flue. A condensing boiler has a larger heat exchanger so it recovers more heat, sends cooler gases up the flue and is more efficient.

Sometimes the flue gases get so cool that the water vapour in the gas condenses out, hence the name, and even more energy is recovered from the condensing vapour.

What should I consider when replacing my boiler?

If it is time to change your boiler, you need to decide what type of boiler is right for you. Here are some things to consider:

Fuel type

If you have mains gas, a gas boiler is likely to be the cheapest heating option. Fuel prices as of May 2017 suggest that oil heating is currently a cheaper option. However, historically oil heating has been more expensive.

If you don’t have a gas supply to your property, it might be worth considering a form of low carbon heating such as a heat pump or biomass. With the renewable heat incentive, these may be cheaper overall.

Alternatively you may want to get a gas connection to your property. The company that owns and operates the gas network in your area may be able to help with the cost of getting a new connection – and it may even be fully funded.

Boiler type

Most old gas and oil boilers are regular boilers that have a separate hot water cylinder to store hot water rather than providing it directly from the boiler. When you replace your boiler, you can buy a new regular boiler, and keep your hot water cylinder, or buy a combi boiler that doesn’t need a cylinder.

A regular boiler is more efficient than a combi at producing hot water in the first place but then some heat is lost from the hot water cylinder, so a combi may be more efficient overall.

Hot water usage

Organisations using lots of hot water are likely to be better off with a regular boiler whereas those using less may be better off with a combi boiler.

Space in your property

Combi boilers don’t need hot water cylinders and so require less space.

Compatibility with solar water heating

If you’re thinking of installing solar water heating, it’s worth noting that many combi boilers are not compatible with this heating system or cannot use it so effectively.

Energy efficient ways to keep cool in the heat

The British aren’t so good at dealing with hot weather, relying on energy-hungry fans and air-conditioning units to get through a heat wave. Here are some tips will help to bring energy bills down to a much cooler level.

Use the windows – It might seem obvious but using windows properly can help circulate air around a property and reduce some of the mugginess associated with a heat wave. Sash windows should be opened equal amounts at the top and bottom; because heat rises, this helps push hot air out while drawing cooler air in. The same principle applies to two-storey properties. Keep upstairs windows open to get rid of hot air and leave downstairs windows open to pull in cooler air and create some much-needed circulation.

Block out sunlight – During the summer it’s tempting to throw the curtains wide to let light in. All this does is heat up rooms so keep curtains and blinds drawn during the day and then, in the evening, open them up to make the most of the natural light for as long as possible.

Unplug – Light bulbs and electrical appliances emit heat. While it might only be a small amount, it’s enough to push an already hot place into unpleasant levels of heat. Eke out as much use as you can from natural light before flicking on electrical lights and swap old light bulbs for new, energy-saving ones. They emit hardly any heat and you could save on annual energy bills.

Take a cool, not cold, shower – A cold shower can be counter-productive as your body will react to dramatic change by trying to preserve heat. It’s much better to have a tepid shower that is cool enough to lower your core body temperature but warm enough to allow blood to the surface of the skin. You won’t need hot water to do this so turn down the boiler’s water thermostat – a tank of hot water will only add to the heat problem.

Use a fan effectively – If you do need to use a fan, create a cross-breeze by positioning it across from an open window or point it downwards so it pushes cooler air up into the rising heat. When things get really hot, position a shallow pan or bowl of ice in front of the fan – the airflow will pick up cold water from the surface of the ice as it melts, creating a cooling breeze.

Consider heat-wave friendly investments – The terms double-glazing and insulation are usually bandied around during winter when we’re keen to keep the heat in and the cold out. But a well insulated house works all year round and in summer keeps heat outside and cool air inside. Insulating your property is an investment that will save money and pay off whatever the weather.

Water is open for business – and switching is easy

With the recent changes to the water market, which came in to effect on April 1 2017, most businesses and organisations in England can now choose which company they want to supply their retail water services.

Eligible businesses, charities and public sector customers are no longer restricted to buying retail water services from their regional water company. Instead, they are now free to choose their water retailer.

Ofwat, the economic regulator of the water sector in England and Wales, says switching to a new water retailer is easy for eligible businesses. Once the decision to switch has been made, the process should take no more than a month to complete.

There are five simple steps to switching:

Determine your water use – Check your latest water bill to find out exactly how much water you use, how much you pay for it and how you pay.

It will be useful to know your:

  • Annual water use
  • Current payment method
  • Current bills and charges information
  • Service supply point identification number or numbers (SPID)

Check your current deal – Knowing the terms of your current contract(s) will also help you get a better deal.

You can decide to switch your:

  • Water supply
  • Wastewater removal
  • Both water services

You may want to talk to your current water supplier to see if you can improve your current contract before shopping around. You can compare what they are offering with other deals on offer before deciding whether to switch.

If you are on a default tariff – also known as a deemed tariff – your retailer has an obligation to tell you about contracts which may be better for you.

Shop around – It is always good to look at what options are available to you, even if your water retailer is offering you a good deal already.

See all the licensed water retailers and wholesalers and find out what contracts and offers are available by:

  • Visiting the retailers’ websites
  • Checking comparison websites
  • Contacting utility/energy brokers and business support services for advice

Agree a deal – Speak to your chosen retailers to see what they can offer. You should talk to your current provider too as you may be able to negotiate a better deal.

Each retailer will:

  • Check and confirm your eligibility
  • Be able to give you any other information you need
  • Answer your questions about the contract

Make your choice – If you are eligible to switch and wish to do so, your chosen retailer(s) will be able to start the process.

While the request to switch is being processed, you have at least seven days to change your mind. This cooling off period is in line with the distance selling regulations.

You can choose to stop the switching process at any time. You do not have to give a reason to stop the switch.

When the switching process is complete, you will be informed and:

  • Your current retailer will issue your final bill for you to pay any remaining charges
  • Your next water bill will be issued by your new retailer for you to pay as agreed